Gumball Estimation

Lesson #10053
10053

Create a gumball machine with gumballs for a math lesson on estimation, surface area or probability.



This gumball machine manipulative can be used across various grade levels for multiple math activities. Teach estimation and find exact answers, find the surface area of the gumball machine with 1" gumballs or discuss probability and likelihood with select gumball colors. This creative activity makes complicated concepts fun.

Estimate the number of gumballs needed to fill a gumball machine and compare the estimate to the exact answer.

13353-XL-Ellison SureCut Die - Flower Pot - XL 15934-LG-Ellison SureCut Die - Circle 1", 9-Up - Large 18645-SM-Ellison SureCut Die - Tags - Small 20173-SM-Ellison SureCut Die - Circle 3" - Small 21292-LG-Ellison SureCut Die - Tags #3 - Large 28397-EW-Ellison SureCut Die - Circle 10" - Extra Wide

Note: The SM Tags have been retired. Consider substituting with the LG Tags #3.

Supplies Used: Cardstock, Chalk, Glue, Pen (Silver), Scissors

The teacher will die-cut the materials for student use prior to the lesson.

  1. Die-cut an EW Circle from white construction paper or cardstock. Alternatively, hand-cut a circle large enough to create the gumball machine.
  2. Die-cut an XL Flower Pot from red construction paper or cardstock.
  3. Turn the Pot upside down and attach behind the Circle.
  4. Attach a Tag to the bottom of the Pot to represent the gumball machine opening.
  5. Die-cut a 3" Circle and attach to the Pot to represent the coin slot.
  6. Die-cut 1" Circles and adhere to the gumball machine to represent gumballs.
  7. Highlight the gumball machine and gumballs with colored pencils or crayons (see Main Photo).

Math: Data Analysis and Probability

Pre-K-5: Instructional programs from Pre-Kindergarten through grade 12 should enable all students to formulate questions that can be addressed with data and collect, organize and display relevant data to answer them.

  • In Pre-Kindergarten through grade 2, all students should sort and classify objects according to their attributes and organize data about the objects.
  • In Pre-Kindergarten through grade 2, all students should represent data using concrete objects, pictures and graphs.
  • In grades 3-5, all students should represent data using tables and graphs such as line plots, bar graphs and line graphs.
  • In grades 3-5, all students should recognize the differences in representing categorical and numerical data.

Math: Problem Solving

Pre-K-12: Instructional programs from Pre-Kindergarten through grade 12 should enable all students to formulate questions that can be addressed with problem solving.

  • In Pre-Kindergarten through grade 12, all students should apply and adapt a variety of appropriate strategies to solve problems.

Standards are listed with permission from Principles and Standards for School Mathematics, copyright 2000 by the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM). NCTM does not endorse the content or validity of these alignments.

Source: Principles and Standards for School Mathematics

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