Sled Kite

Lesson #10217
10217

Use Classroom Series Dies to assemble and decorate your own Sled Kite!



This is a perfect science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) project. Research the advantages of wind energy as a natural, renewable resource. Understand how the sun provides energy to drive convection, heating the atmosphere and creating wind. Students conduct scientific investigations to explore wind energy, by assembling and flying Kites. Explore the technology of Kites and determine ways to make the Kite more aerodynamic. Calculate speed and velocity over several trials. Challenge students to create unique Kite designs using any desired pattern and assortment of materials.

Sled Kites are great for project-based, inquiry learning!

A11041-Sizzix Bigz Pro Die - Kite, Sled

Supplies Used: Construction Paper, Drinking Straws, Plastic Trash Bag or Tissue/Crepe Paper, Straws, Kite String, Rubber Cement or Tape

The teacher will die-cut the materials for student use prior to the lesson.

  1. TIP - Apply a piece of tape along the open end of the die-cut to us as a guide (Figure A).
  2. Fold an 18" x 12" sheet of construction paper (or material of choice) in half. Align the folded edge of the paper with the open end of the blade (Figure B).
  3. To increase the rigidity of the Kite, tape stirring straws along the length of the outside folds as shown (Figure C).
  4. Cut a piece of string approximately 3" in length. Securely tie the ends through the holes on the tips of the outside panels. Make a simple loop in the middle of the string. This will ensure that your guideline stays centered (Figure D).
  5. Make tails from 1" - 2" strips of plastic trash bags, tissue paper, crepe paper or a similar lightweight flexible material. Attach them to the bottom of the Kite, one below each support straw. Length of tails will vary depending on the strength of the wind and the weight of the slected material (Figure E).
  6. Tie guide string to the front of the Kite and you are ready to fly (see Main Photo)!

  • Figure A

  • Figure B

  • Figure C

  • Figure D

  • Figure E

Math: Geometry

Pre-K-12: Instructional programs from Pre-Kindergarten through grade 12 should enable all students to analyze characteristics and properties of two- and three-dimensional geometric shapes and develop mathematical arguments about geometric relationships.

  • In Pre-Kindergarten through grade 2, all students should recognize, name, build, draw, compare and sort two- and three-dimensional shapes.
  • In grades 3-5, all students should identify, compare, and analyze attributes of two- and three-dimensional shapes and develop vocabulary to describe the attributes.
  • In grades 6-8, all students should understand relationships among the angles, side lengths, perimeters, areas and volumes of similar objects.
  • In grades 9-12, all students should use trigonometric relationships to determine lengths and angle measures.

Pre-K-12: Instructional programs from Pre-Kindergarten through grade 12 should enable all students to use visualization, spatial reasoning and geometric modeling to solve problems.

  • In Pre-Kindergarten through grade 2, all students should recognize geometric shapes and structures in the environment and specify their location.
  • In grades 3-5, all students should use geometric models to solve problems in other areas of mathematics, such as number and measurement.
  • In grades 6-8, all students should recognize and apply geometric ideas and relationships in areas outside the mathematics classroom, such as art, science and everyday life.
  • In grades 9-12, all students should visualize three-dimensional objects and spaces from different perspectives and analyze their cross sections.

Standards are listed with permission from Principles and Standards for School Mathematics, copyright 2000 by the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM). NCTM does not endorse the content or validity of these alignments.

Source: Principles and Standards for School Mathematics

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